Future Cougar: Samuel Tormos

Houston Cougars signee Samuel Tormos at-bat for the Van Alstyne Panthers.
Samuel Tormos at-bat for the Van Alstyne Panthers.

Houston Cougars signee Samuel Tormos had every reason in the world to want a full 2020 baseball season. In his junior season, after having already committed to the University of Houston, Tormos led the Van Alstyne Panthers to the state 3A semifinals in Round Rock with a 29-6 record. Tormos did so by hitting .482 with 32 RBI, 2 homeruns, 18 stolen bases, and a .604 on-base percentage. Numbers good enough to earn Tormos the District 10-3A Offensive MVP.

Tormos also aided the Panthers on the mound by going 6-2 with a 1.67 ERA and 53 strikeouts in 46 innings.

Tormos is a three-sport standout, also playing on the school’s basketball team and running for the track team. “I played basketball and ran track because they were fun,” says Tormos. “It keeps you in shape, it works out different areas of your body.” The basketball team made a deep run in the playoffs, and that run overlapped with the start of the baseball season, so Tormos was late getting on the diamond this year. But already, he was hitting .625 with a .769 on-base percentage.

Then the now infamous second week of March started to play out. Tormos and his Panthers teammates were playing a tournament. With a division-leading record of 9-3, having won the night before, Van Alstyne was scheduled to play an early morning game. There was rain, which was possibly going to cause problems, but Tormos points out that they were playing the tournament on a turf field, so there was a good chance the rain was not going to cause cancellation.

But then, a text message. 

“Ok guys, everything is now cancelled,” read the text from head Coach Jimmy Haynes. “Tourney is canceled due to CoronaVirus.” The young players began to process all of this, and Tormos and his teammates were learning more about what was happening, “we started getting more information from the UIL tweeting out stuff and the district tweeting out as well,” he said.

Asked about how his numbers in his senior season were better from his junior season, Tormos pointed to some very specific improvements, “I got a lot stronger. Spraying the ball all over the field and I got better using a big part of the field a lot.” Work on these things began last summer after the state playoff run came to an end when he played travel baseball.

Now, with the pause in the season, Tormos is not alone in having to find ways to be ready, for either the resumption of the high school season, potential summer ball, or reporting to the University of Houston for the late summer and fall. “I’m working out a lot, getting stronger,” Tormos says. “I’m still long tossing, throwing. Hitting in the cage pretty much every day. Just trying to stay on top of the baseball skills.”

Houston Cougars signee Samuel Tormos at short for the Panthers in Round Rock.
Samuel Tormos at shortstop at Dell Diamond.

Samuel knows how to improve his game during summer ball, he knows how to utilize the time well. He does not know if there will be a summer ball league this year. If the summer league does happen, Tormos will be there, “you know, just to get some reps, live ABs.”

During the summer between Samuel’s sophomore and junior years, he was playing in a Perfect Game tournament in Georgia, and that is where the Houston Cougars reached out to him. Tormos says, “It seemed like an automatic fit, really.” He committed to the Cougars on September 11, 2018.

The kid who started playing coach-pitch baseball at the age of seven will soon go from being a Panther in Van Alstyne to a Cougar in Houston. “I’ve had the privilege to coach Samuel since he was a freshman. His natural ability was evident from the first time I saw him on a baseball field,” says his head coach Jimmy Haynes. “You could tell he was going to be a special baseball player. As he grew, his baseball ability grew as well. Samuel was constantly working to improve his baseball skills. I would see him working extra after practice each day whether it was fielding or hitting.”

This writer witnessed and wrote about Samuel Tormos and his Panther team during their playoff run last summer. I wrote then about Tormos’s fluid, easy movement around the baseball field, especially at the shortstop position. Being out there appears natural for him. He seems at home there. He admits to being relaxed on the baseball field and credits part of that to not over-thinking things, he lets the game happen.

What about his upside?

Coach Haynes notes, “As you know, Samuel has been dividing his efforts between basketball, track and baseball. Now that he’s going to be able to concentrate solely on baseball, it will allow him to really excel at baseball. Being able to concentrate on nutrition, strength building and baseball will only un-tap his potential. I believe, because of this untapped potential, you might see him have a chance to play at the professional level. Nothing Samuel achieves will be a surprise to me.”

Samuel Tormos indicates that he was recruited as an infielder, but can play anywhere on the diamond, and will even pitch if need be. The three-sport star can do three things well between the lines on a baseball field. The future Cougar who saw Houston as the “automatic fit” will soon find out where he fits with the baseball program as he focuses and devotes his time solely to the game of baseball. It is easy to expect big things from Tormos. Writers can see it. Coaches can see it. As important, Samuel Tormos sees it. –